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"The Veneer all cut": On the production of saw veneers

My current activity as a dealer of rare and exotic woods was preceded by many years of self-employment as a restorer for antique furniture and clocks Berlin for private clients, museums and collections. In addition to this activity I have been dealing since 1990 with saw veneers produced on a historic veneer saw as well as selling rare woods, horn, tortoiseshell and ivory for restoration purposes.
From this time comes my special interest for the rare woods of past epochs as well as their origin and processing. Hundreds of years ago, when building valuable furniture, cabinetmakers were always looking for a way to use the very expensive woods, mostly from overseas, as effectively and decoratively as possible in order to achieve the best possible yield and maximum decorative effect from the valuable wood. The production of decorative veneers already played an important role in the 18th century: until the beginning of the 20th century it was an important requirement and often a task for highly specialised experts and specially developed machines and tools to achieve an optimum result on veneer surfaces with as little waste as possible. The following article was written for the book
Königliches Parkett in preußischen Schlössern - Geschichte, Erhaltung und Restaurierung begehbarer Kunstwerke
(Royal Parquet in Prussian Castles - History, Preservation and Restoration of Walk-in Works of Art)

written by me. The article is easy to read on the photos, and if you are interested in the background and the history of the historical saw veneer production, certainly a good source of information.

 

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